"The benefits of music therapy go beyond the sessions, they have revealed his ability to communicate, make choices and displayed his sense of humour."
Julie, Eastbourne. (Son aged 11 with Autism)

Frequently Asked Questions

What happens in a Music Therapy session?
How do I arrange therapy for myself/other?
How do I refer someone?
Who does it help?
How does it help?
What does it cost?
How long does it last?
What qualifications do you need to become a Music Therapist?
Is there a regulatory body ensuring high standards of professional practice?
Do you need to be a musician to have Music Therapy?
Will I learn to play an instrument?
Where do Music Therapist's work?
What are your payment terms?
How often are the sessions?
When does the therapy end?
How do you pay for therapy and is there any help?
Is there any research that supports the use of Music Therapy?
My child's having Music Therapy, is there anything I need to do?
What is a Hang?


What happens in a Music Therapy session?
The session content is changeable and is completely tailored to each individual. This is discussed in an Initial Consultation before entering into a 3 week assessment period. It is during this assessment period that the structure and aims of the therapy are honed and developed further. It is fair to assume that each session will include the opportunity for creative musical interaction and communicative expression through the use of music. Musical instruments will be provided; percussion, guitar, Hang, tuned percussion, keyboard, and others upon request. If the client has specific musical interests i.e. meaningful songs or plays/has certain instruments that they are confident with, the therapist can consider and integrate these into the course of therapy.


How do I arrange therapy for myself/other?
Firstly it is best to use our contact page for initial considerations regarding appropriate referrals. Once discussed and agreed that this would be a useful and meaningful session a formal consultation will be arranged before progressing into a 3 week assessment period.
How do I refer someone?
For all initial enquiries please use the contact page or download the Referral Form.
Referrals also taken through Belltree Music Therapy, The Music Well, and via East Sussex Music Services. Other avenues include the find a therapist page on the BAMT website and if available through schools, county music services or relevant charitable organisations.
Who does it help?
Music Therapy can be useful for anyone and everyone due to it's individual focus and tailored approaches. This being said it is not for everyone. Some may prefer verbal discussion with a Psychotherapist or Counsellor, others may prefer a different form of Arts Therapy and are more comfortable with expression through Dramatherapy, Art Therapy or Dance Movement Therapy. Please see Who can benefit? for more information on specific client group aims and benefits.
How does it help?
Music Therapy is a psychological therapy that utilises music as a tool through which the client can express, create and experiment with emotion, relationships and past experiences. It is both psychologically and physically motivating and aids with a number of different physical aims including fine motor skills and flexibility. For more specific gains please see Who can benefit?.
What does it cost
All costs are in accordance with national pay scales for Music Therapists (BAMT), are inclusive of the therapist’s set up time, ongoing notes, liaison with other professionals, reports, and attending necessary meetings.


Initial Consultation and 3 Assessment sessions £150

Pay by session;
Private Individual Session £40
Group Session £18 per person (Maximum of 4-6 Group members dependant on ability)

Pre-paid block of sessions;
Private Individual Session x 10 £350

If it is necessary to travel a long distance to carry out the requested sessions it may be necessary to arrange a travel subsidiary also. Please contact for further information.


How long does it last?
Each session will be once weekly and will generally last for between 30 and 50 minutes dependant on whether it is for an individual, group and on the ability of each client. It is important to ensure regularity of venue and time but the over all length of therapy is to be discussed with carers, parents and clients to decide when it will be periodically reassessed and when to work towards a structured ending.

It is not recommended to complete less than a series of 10 sessions. This allows for a good standard of session and for a structured ending. If there are specific aims to work towards or long term gains and benefits it is common for the period of therapy to last for a year or more. This accommodates for more complex cases and needs and allows for a more in depth therapeutic relationship resulting in a larger variety of lasting developments. For more client specific estimates and/or an informal discussion please use our contact page.
What qualifications do you need to become a Music Therapist?
To work as a Music Therapist you must complete a 2 year post graduate degree at an accredited institution. This would be comprised of both research into theoretical models and understandings as well as practical experience in a variety of settings. There are only 7 institutions currently providing such training nationally. This qualification then allows for the therapist to register with the Health and Care Profession Council.
Is there a regulatory body ensuring high standards of professional practice?
Yes. All Music Therapist's must have a valid registration with the Health and Care Professions Council and are required to keep up to date with latest research developments through Continuous Professional Development. All sessions are required to be externally supervised by a qualified practitioner to ensure the highest professional standards.
Do you need to be a musician to have Music Therapy?
No. You don't need any previous music experience to have Music Therapy as it is by design all inclusive. There are instruments available for all musical abilities and interests that allow for musical expression and creativity.
Will I learn to play an instrument?
Not as a direct consequence of the Music therapy. Your confidence and skills may improve but these are not a focus of the therapy as it is more to do with your therapeutic aims rather than musical techniques and theories.
Where do Music Therapist's work?
Music therapists work in a number of institutions, areas and client bases including; Hospitals, Special Needs Schools, Mainstream Schools, Hospices, Children Development Centres, Freelance (at client's home, institution, school), In-patient Units, NHS institutions, Residential Homes, Assessment Centres, Community Centres, Out-patient Services and Prisons.
What are your payment terms?
It is possible to arrange a session by session payment if necessary but it would be preferable to invoice monthly, termly or per block of sessions as agreed. To cover costs we are committed to charging for sessions cancelled by the client. Where a session is cancelled by the therapist no charge applies.
How often are the sessions?
The sessions take place once weekly and last for 30-50minutes depending on the ability and needs of the client.
When does the therapy end?
The therapy may end after an agreed period of sessions or as reassessed regularly through discussion and reports it may be possible to extend the therapy over a longer period. It is necessary to provide a structured and shared ending. This needs to be introduced to the therapy structure at least 3-4 weeks before the chosen ending time.
How do you pay for therapy and is there any help?
All parents, carers and/or clients will receive an invoice after each agreed period which will contain the relevant payment processes. If extra help is needed Jonathan can advise and help in compiling applications to charitable organisations or funding agencies.
Is there any research that supports the use of Music Therapy?
Yes. Music Therapists have compiled a large amount of research projects and are always further developing the understanding of it's uses as an session. The profession has achieved recognition by the NICE Guidelines (National Institute of Clinical Excellence) as a recommended form of therapy for Adults with Dementia, Adults and Children with Mental Health Diagnoses; specifically for Schizophrenia, and for children on the Autistic Spectrum.
My child's having Music Therapy, is there anything I need to do?
At times it may be beneficial to include the parent/carer in the therapy itself especially when the aims are to increase playful communication and interaction with a parent/carer. This can be incredibly useful in some situations but it is not always ideal. By allowing the client to relate to the therapist directly and individually it can allow further space for expression and discussion. It is important to retain good communications between parent/carer and therapist through regular discussions and these are extremely useful for all parties. These discussion aren't always ideal with the client present and may be best to review progress over the phone or during regular meetings.
What is a Hang?
The Hang is a steel based sculpture developed in Bern, Switzerland by Felix Rohner and Sabina Schärer at the HANGBAU. The Hang is a compilation of musical influences; Ghatam, Steel Pan and Gamelan, which creates entirely unique audible, visual and tactile experiences. It is explored rather than played and can create excellent opportunities for shared expression as well as personal development. Please see www.hanghang.info for more detailed explanations.